Standing Stallions

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The Steward
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Standing Stallions

Post by The Steward » 10 years ago

Standing Stallions

Players can stand their own stallions and set their own stud fees. (New players must wait until they have reached Junior High Status to stand a stallion). To stand a stallion, just retire your male horse (not a gelding) and set a stud fee. Stallions must have won at least one race, or they cannot stand.

What makes a good stallion?
It is very hard to stand a good stallion. It is expensive, because for a stallion to be successful he must be mated with many mares of good quality and produce winning foals. Here are some qualifications to abide by when breeding to and standing a stallion of all breeds:
  • Should be a multiple stakes winner, preferably graded
  • Should have earned over $350,000
  • Should have a nice family, with stakes winners on both sides
If your the horse doesn't meet these qualifications, it is likely the horse won't be a good stallion. Sometimes a horse is a monster on the track but comes from a bad family. Because pedigree makes or breaks a horse's potential in the breeding shed, the owner must consider keeping the horse on the track versus retiring and raking in potential stud fees. It's a tricky decision!

Cross Breeding
As of Year 41, players can make their Thoroughbred or Quarter Horse stallion available for cross breeding. Such availability costs a one-time 5,000 GP fee to the stallion owner.

Any Thoroughbred can be made available for crossing-breeding to Quarter Horse mares, though only dirt stallions are recommended. Any Quarter Horse stallion can be made available for cross-breeding to Paint and Appaloosa mares.
"There's no secret to training a good horse. It's a matter of being fortunate enough to get one."
"Funny how you often regret the stuff you didn't do more than the stuff you did do" - GG

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